From Food Safety Tech: HACCP, HARPC, and How Using Software Helps

This article, published by Food Safety Tech, was written by Icicle creator Steven Burton.

With nearly one in every six Americans falling prey to foodborne illnesses each year, food safety is a major public health issue. For several decades, current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs) provided the basic food safety framework for manufacturers. However, these guidelines were not sufficient to cover all potential food safety hazards. In the 1960s, NASA asked Pillsbury to manufacture the first foods for space flights, and so the Hazard Analysis & Critical Control Point (HACCP) system was born. HACCP was later endorsed by the Codex Alimentarius Commission, which was formed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization in 1963.

HACCP is a global standard and its principles are the defining elements of ISO 22000, BRC and SQF, all premiere global food safety standards. In 1996, an E. coli outbreak in Scotland claimed 10 lives. The Pennington report in the aftermath of this tragedy recommended use of HACCP by all food manufacturers to ensure food safety. While HACCP is mandatorily used for seafood, juice and USDA-regulated meat processing, it could not win universal acceptance across the food industry; most of the food industry sectors rely on cGMP for providing a food safety framework.

The number of people affected by foodborne illnesses can be attributed to a flawed food safety system. Thinking caps were put on and President Obama’s administration rigorously pursued what it hoped would be an effective food safety paradigm. On July 4, 2012 Hazard Analysis and Risk Based Prevention Control (HARPC) was introduced under FSMA section 103. Although the system is still a work in progress and FDA has yet not disclosed the regulations that will determine the functionality of HARPC, the agency is bound to issue the regulations by August 30, 2015. HARPC will become effective 60 days following this date, and companies will be required to enforce HARPC within a period of 12 to 36 months, depending on the size of a facility…continue reading at Food Safety Tech

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